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Beware Trick - or -Treaters are coming

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Beware Trick - or -Treaters are coming

Jenifer Arent

Passionate about organization, attention to detail, learning new things, and crafting, she is the perfect person for this job, where she gets to put t...

Passionate about organization, attention to detail, learning new things, and crafting, she is the perfect person for this job, where she gets to put t...

Sep 27 3 minutes read

With the fall season upon us, fall traditions comes with them.  Trick or Treating is a time kids look forward to every year.  Not every kid experience this holiday the same way.  There are groups that have some difficulty with this holiday. Those with autism and those with nut allergies are just an example.   There has been a movement with these groups to help those hosting candy giving homes with these difficulties. 

Have you ever had a guest with a teal pumpkin or a tall trick or treater with a blue pumpkin?  The color of the pumpkin will give you a clue as to what this trick or treater is trying to tell you.

A blue pumpkin is not very well known. The color blue is adopted by autism and worn on April 2 for World Autism Awareness Day.  One mom that son with autism loves Halloween wanted her neighbors to know that, while his body might be that of a grown man, he still loves trick or treating.  This mom posted a photo of a blue plastic pumpkin on her Facebook page to let her neighbors know that if they saw a grown man with the pumpkin that it was her son.  His favorite holiday is Halloween and still wants to participate.  The post has gone viral but not everyone knows about it.  The “blue bucket” is not a universal symbol for autistic trick or treaters nor will all autistic people carry a blue bucket.  

A teal pumpkin either on the front porch of a hosting house lets you know that this house is offering an alternative treat for someone with a food allergy.  A house with a teal pumpkin might be offering alternative treats such as a toy, as an example.  In 2014, Food Allery Research & Education (FARE) group started the “Teal Pumpkin Project”.  FARE wanted a way for families with allergies to still be included with this holiday and not feel that they had to pass the holiday up. FARE suggests some alternative treats that can be passed out are bubbles, glow bracelets, stickers, or playing cards.  This gives those with food allergies a chance to also choose a treat when they come to your door.  Please remember to have this alternative treat offered in a separate bowl when serving your guests.

If you need a blue or a teal pumpkin please contact us and we would love to give you one!


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